Beginner Lifting Guide

For Discussion about Health, Well-being, Traditional Remedies, and much more.
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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Sep 25, 2017 10:06 am

Some benefits to lifting:
    Strengthen Central nervous system
    More energy and vitality
    Looking good

Some cons:
    Thots won't leave you alone
    Increased appetite
    Being too sexy

Things you need:
Olympic Barbell
Olympic Plates
Rack
Dumbbells
Bench
(or a gym)

Recommend starter program: Greyskull LP

Image

Some tips:
Practice form, there's a ton of youtube videos, form is very important to prevent injury
CONSISTENCY IS KEY

As Satanists I believe we should all be fit and healthy

Centralforce666
Posts: 347

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Centralforce666 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 7:17 pm

What are thots?
Si vis pacem, para bellum

If you want a peaceful life, prepare for war

HP Mageson666
Posts: 2431

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HP Mageson666 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 10:29 pm

Its a ghetto term for "That hoe over there". the jews in the alt right then pushed this into the lexicon.

Centralforce666 wrote:What are thots?

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:25 am

HP Mageson666 wrote:Its a ghetto term for "That hoe over there". the jews in the alt right then pushed this into the lexicon.

Centralforce666 wrote:What are thots?


I think it's more instagram, frat lingo since it's something the average college student says here

basically I assign it to anyone who gives me unwanted attention/flirting

Dawn
Posts: 1

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Dawn » Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:44 am

Weev is a Jew. The Jews are pushing "White Sharia".

Aquarius
Posts: 5094

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Aquarius » Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:02 am

I think lifting is good, but way too many people neglect mobility and 1 year later they find themselfes the tightest people on earth and looking back they wished they stretched and did mobility work. I'd add Kit Laughlin's stretches in every fitness programm
HAIL TO OUR TRUE INEFFABLE GOD SATAN

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Stormblood
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Location: Academy of the Dragon, Dinas Ffaraon

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:26 pm

I find calisthenics/bodyweight exercises more efficient, as you don't need to buy any equipment nor you have any need for a gym subscription. But to each his own. I don't use external weights myself, but I don't find anything wrong with people who use them as long as they don't neglect mobility training, as suggested by Aquarius.
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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:59 pm

Dawn wrote:Weev is a Jew. The Jews are pushing "White Sharia".

Ok?

Stormblood wrote:I find calisthenics/bodyweight exercises more efficient, as you don't need to buy any equipment nor you have any need for a gym subscription. But to each his own. I don't use external weights myself, but I don't find anything wrong with people who use them as long as they don't neglect mobility training, as suggested by Aquarius.

I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.

Aquarius
Posts: 5094

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Aquarius » Thu Sep 28, 2017 6:42 pm

AscendingSun wrote:
Dawn wrote:Weev is a Jew. The Jews are pushing "White Sharia".

Ok?

Stormblood wrote:I find calisthenics/bodyweight exercises more efficient, as you don't need to buy any equipment nor you have any need for a gym subscription. But to each his own. I don't use external weights myself, but I don't find anything wrong with people who use them as long as they don't neglect mobility training, as suggested by Aquarius.

I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.
try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol
HAIL TO OUR TRUE INEFFABLE GOD SATAN

HP Mageson666
Posts: 2431

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HP Mageson666 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:55 pm

Image

As you can see I am a masterz of exercisez and stuff.

The fact is heavy weight training can ruin your joints in time and cause other injuries and issues in the body. So can excessive body weight training and running. I notice a lot of the training attitudes and programs are stupid and worthless. That tell some person they need to be in super athletic shape to sit at their office desk and run errands. Its pointless and just leaves a lot of people injured, sore, bored, and wary of exercise. There is no point in training like that unless your going to be a professional athlete, personal trainer or fitness model.

General exercise is just to maintain wellness. So find something you like doing. I suggest a mini trampoline you can do all types of exercise on it and its all low impact so you don't hurt yourself. And you can workout on it seven days a week as its indoors and you don't need a high money gym membership.


The other nonsense thing is exercise is being sold for weight loss. Exercise can cause weight loss but its not about weight loss. You can exercise hard and burn four thousand calories that day but if you eat five thousand calories you are not maintaining a calorie window to burn. Weight loss is about calories its not about health. You can lose weight on junk food. Diet is about health and weight loss if done right.

HP Mageson666
Posts: 2431

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HP Mageson666 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:58 pm

A lot of nonsense in the Bro world is six pack abs this and that. I got six pack abs back in my weight training days by going on a heavy calorie restrictive diet. That brought my body fat levels down to the right percent to bring out the muscle definition. But I had to get off the diet because after awhile it was not enough to eat and I still had to work. I also lost some muscle mass. I did it natural. And I did it with what today is called a vegan diet.

I didn't need to start a utube channel making endless video's pretending to teach people secrets to six pack abs. You just need to bring the body fat down to the right ratio.

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Sep 28, 2017 11:04 pm

Aquarius wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:
Dawn wrote:Weev is a Jew. The Jews are pushing "White Sharia".

Ok?

Stormblood wrote:I find calisthenics/bodyweight exercises more efficient, as you don't need to buy any equipment nor you have any need for a gym subscription. But to each his own. I don't use external weights myself, but I don't find anything wrong with people who use them as long as they don't neglect mobility training, as suggested by Aquarius.

I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.
try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol


There is a different between time/tension and strength. I don't see any value in being able to do 100 pushups. If you want to do cardio then go running.

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Sep 28, 2017 11:25 pm

HP Mageson666 wrote:Image

As you can see I am a masterz of exercisez and stuff.

The fact is heavy weight training can ruin your joints in time and cause other injuries and issues in the body. So can excessive body weight training and running. I notice a lot of the training attitudes and programs are stupid and worthless. That tell some person they need to be in super athletic shape to sit at their office desk and run errands. Its pointless and just leaves a lot of people injured, sore, bored, and wary of exercise. There is no point in training like that unless your going to be a professional athlete, personal trainer or fitness model.

General exercise is just to maintain wellness. So find something you like doing. I suggest a mini trampoline you can do all types of exercise on it and its all low impact so you don't hurt yourself. And you can workout on it seven days a week as its indoors and you don't need a high money gym membership.


The other nonsense thing is exercise is being sold for weight loss. Exercise can cause weight loss but its not about weight loss. You can exercise hard and burn four thousand calories that day but if you eat five thousand calories you are not maintaining a calorie window to burn. Weight loss is about calories its not about health. You can lose weight on junk food. Diet is about health and weight loss if done right.


I do it for the discipline gainz and because the addiction. I feel like crap if I'm away from it for like a week.

I've found just by eating healthier foods, like straight from the farm food, I don't gain much fat even though I eat lots of fatty food. I'm sure the junk people eat causes imbalances that lead to overeating and other problems. Someone told me of an obese woman that had multiple vitamin deficiencies that could be easily solved by eating a cup of spinach. I've heard of multiple cases of obese people with scurvy as well. Like damn people eat some tomatoes every once in a while.

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Sep 28, 2017 11:31 pm

Aquarius wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:
Dawn wrote:Weev is a Jew. The Jews are pushing "White Sharia".

Ok?

Stormblood wrote:I find calisthenics/bodyweight exercises more efficient, as you don't need to buy any equipment nor you have any need for a gym subscription. But to each his own. I don't use external weights myself, but I don't find anything wrong with people who use them as long as they don't neglect mobility training, as suggested by Aquarius.

I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.
try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol


And that burn you feel is just lactic acid by the way. Pullups are a different because you are pulling a lot of weight. Heavy compound lifts use more of your nervous system than anything else.

Aquarius
Posts: 5094

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Aquarius » Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:24 am

AscendingSun wrote:
Aquarius wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:Ok?


I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.
try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol


And that burn you feel is just lactic acid by the way. Pullups are a different because you are pulling a lot of weight. Heavy compound lifts use more of your nervous system than anything else.
I am not talking about the burn but the inability do to 1 more exercise
HAIL TO OUR TRUE INEFFABLE GOD SATAN

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Stormblood
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Fri Sep 29, 2017 10:24 am

AscendingSun wrote:
Aquarius wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:Ok?


I think lifting heavy is better since it uses your central nervous system so much and my idea is if you make your nervous system more developed you empower the pathways for energy flow through. But yes mobility exercises and keeping up your flexibility are important obviously. Also if you feel stagnant energy in you muscles you need to foam roll or do gua sha (muscle scraping) on top stretching and yoga.
try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol


There is a different between time/tension and strength. I don't see any value in being able to do 100 pushups. If you want to do cardio then go running.


Calisthenics is weight-lifting. Instead of using external weights, you use your natural body weight. That's the difference. You don't need to get to 100 regular push-ups. When you think you are fit enough to do your chosen number of push-ups with proper form, you increase the difficulty by doing, for example, diamond push-ups, which is harder. It's the same as increasing the weight in the gym, only that you don't need any to buy weights and you don't need a gym subscription.

From regular pull-ups, you could move to L-sit pull-ups.
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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Sat Sep 30, 2017 5:11 am

Aquarius wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:
Aquarius wrote: try to go to failure with pullups, pushups, dips and then tell me that lifting uses much nervous system. lol


And that burn you feel is just lactic acid by the way. Pullups are a different because you are pulling a lot of weight. Heavy compound lifts use more of your nervous system than anything else.
I am not talking about the burn but the inability do to 1 more exercise


But the inability to do 1 more IS FROM LACTIC ACID NOT THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. You can tell when your nervous system is over taxed because you will be very tired.

https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/hi ... -best.html

You need to spend dedicated periods of time in both the high-rep and low-rep ranges to maximize your development. High reps build muscle and connective tissue strength, and give your body respite from the grind of low-rep sets, too. Similarly, low-rep sets build neuromuscular and CNS efficiency. When you become more efficient and then go back to your big lifts, you can use even more weight than before, because you're just that much more efficient and effective.

There is a ton of literature on high reps vs low reps

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Stormblood
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Sat Sep 30, 2017 3:33 pm

AscendingSun, the difference between high-reps and low-reps applies to any weight-lifting, including calisthenics. The thing is that in real life, you don't need just lifting strength. You also need pulling strength, pushing strength and sometimes even striking strength. Lifting only developes, you figured it, lifting strength. What of the other kinds? You need to complement your lifting regime with other things to develop.

That aside, as HP Mageson said, your physical fitness should be adequate to what your personal dharma requires. You know, your career, your lifestyle and stuff. I agree with that and I hope I understood it right.

bodybuilding.com is one of the mainstream channels of bro-science and thus unadvised.
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ThomaSsS
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Location: Romania

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby ThomaSsS » Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:44 pm

AscendingSun wrote:Image

Is it indeed a good idea to work the same body parts (following the same routine) many days in a row? Cause everywhere I read they say one should give muscles at least one day to rest and from my own experience I can only confirm this. Obviously if your job is of such a nature as to require you to use the same muscles everyday as in constructions or whatever, then it's a different story. But if you work out just to be sexy perhaps you should give them muscles time to rest and grow? That being said, wouldn't it be more suitable to do one day legs and butt, next day abs and back and third day arms and chest -- or something like that?

Centralforce666
Posts: 347

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Centralforce666 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 1:50 am

Working the same muscles in the same ways day in day out is a recipe for disaster.

The qi and blood stagnates in repetitive motions and more and more stretching is needed to keep it moving. Guasha and cupping are medical treatments to move qi and blood.

If you have to do them to support your exercise regime then your exercise regime is too heavy and unbalanced.

HOWEVER, this depends on what you are trying to achieve. Iron Palm practitioners smash their hands against a series of progressively harder mediums in order to make their hands very hard. They also apply a medical liniment multiple times daily to deal with the qi and blood stagnation which results.

So you can do this, if you are seeking to grow huge muscles and lift cars etc. Etc.

But you do not NEED to do this.

And it is definitely not for beginners.
Si vis pacem, para bellum

If you want a peaceful life, prepare for war

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Sun Oct 01, 2017 5:49 am

ThomaSsS wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:Image

Is it indeed a good idea to work the same body parts (following the same routine) many days in a row? Cause everywhere I read they say one should give muscles at least one day to rest and from my own experience I can only confirm this. Obviously if your job is of such a nature as to require you to use the same muscles everyday as in constructions or whatever, then it's a different story. But if you work out just to be sexy perhaps you should give them muscles time to rest and grow? That being said, wouldn't it be more suitable to do one day legs and butt, next day abs and back and third day arms and chest -- or something like that?


This program is every other day. For example you lift M W F and rest Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday

There is PPL Push Pull Legs, so you don't overlap muscles. This is also a good routine. I would say it's more intermediate though.
https://www.reddit.com/r/Fitness/commen ... ogram_for/

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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Sun Oct 01, 2017 5:59 am

Stormblood wrote:AscendingSun, the difference between high-reps and low-reps applies to any weight-lifting, including calisthenics. The thing is that in real life, you don't need just lifting strength. You also need pulling strength, pushing strength and sometimes even striking strength. Lifting only developes, you figured it, lifting strength. What of the other kinds? You need to complement your lifting regime with other things to develop.

That aside, as HP Mageson said, your physical fitness should be adequate to what your personal dharma requires. You know, your career, your lifestyle and stuff. I agree with that and I hope I understood it right.

bodybuilding.com is one of the mainstream channels of bro-science and thus unadvised.


You clearly have no idea what you're talking about. How is pulling, pushing, etc not part of lifting??? What are rows, what is bench press?
The difference between lifting weight and calisthenics is reps/weight.

Just because it's "mainstream" doesn't mean it has no valuable information. Do some research yourself, you need it.

Frinnis
Posts: 62

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Frinnis » Sun Oct 01, 2017 8:21 am

HP Mageson666 wrote:Image

As you can see I am a masterz of exercisez and stuff.

The fact is heavy weight training can ruin your joints in time and cause other injuries and issues in the body. So can excessive body weight training and running. I notice a lot of the training attitudes and programs are stupid and worthless. That tell some person they need to be in super athletic shape to sit at their office desk and run errands. Its pointless and just leaves a lot of people injured, sore, bored, and wary of exercise. There is no point in training like that unless your going to be a professional athlete, personal trainer or fitness model.

General exercise is just to maintain wellness. So find something you like doing. I suggest a mini trampoline you can do all types of exercise on it and its all low impact so you don't hurt yourself. And you can workout on it seven days a week as its indoors and you don't need a high money gym membership.


The other nonsense thing is exercise is being sold for weight loss. Exercise can cause weight loss but its not about weight loss. You can exercise hard and burn four thousand calories that day but if you eat five thousand calories you are not maintaining a calorie window to burn. Weight loss is about calories its not about health. You can lose weight on junk food. Diet is about health and weight loss if done right.




Thanks to the jews total basterdization of the phrase, `pain is temporary, pride is eternal`, people tend to ignore what their own body is telling them loud and clear in attempt to get, `gainz fe dayz`instead of just resting for a few. Pain can be eternal and even if it isn`t it can sure feel like it.

What I`ve started doing is every time I get up from my desk, I do twenty push ups and twenty squats in two sets of ten. I do it every day unless my muscles are starting to ache to which I give them a few days of recovery time and this is working out quite well for me.

A little side note on push ups as a lot of people are talking body weight training: for those of you who are unable to do a normal push up, i.e. flat on the ground, What I am doing is going to a decent size stair case (Ideal is one that goes up to you neck when you are standing at the base) and proceed to do incline push ups from the second step at the top of the stairs. Once you think that that is getting too easy, you go down to the next step and so on and so on until you reach the bottom of the stair case in which case you are now doing normal push ups. Now when those get too easy, you turn your body around and place your feet on the bottom step and do atomic pushups and gradually work you way up to steeper and steeper decline pushups.


Another side note which I think will blow a lot of peoples minds but it does make sense if you think about it: Eating unhealthy and going on a diet are the same thing. When you go on a diet, you are putting your body on a calorie deficit which is eating unhealthy. The only thing that is different is you are going to stop your diet after you reached a specific weight goal to look a certain way for a short length of time.

In short: Models diet, we eat healthy.

As a matter of fact, if some of you started to keep track of your calories, you will find that you would not have to change your current eating habits at all, you really just need to get more active.

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Stormblood
Posts: 3526
Location: Academy of the Dragon, Dinas Ffaraon

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Sun Oct 01, 2017 12:22 pm

AscendingSun wrote:
Stormblood wrote:AscendingSun, the difference between high-reps and low-reps applies to any weight-lifting, including calisthenics. The thing is that in real life, you don't need just lifting strength. You also need pulling strength, pushing strength and sometimes even striking strength. Lifting only developes, you figured it, lifting strength. What of the other kinds? You need to complement your lifting regime with other things to develop.

That aside, as HP Mageson said, your physical fitness should be adequate to what your personal dharma requires. You know, your career, your lifestyle and stuff. I agree with that and I hope I understood it right.

bodybuilding.com is one of the mainstream channels of bro-science and thus unadvised.


You clearly have no idea what you're talking about. How is pulling, pushing, etc not part of lifting??? What are rows, what is bench press?
The difference between lifting weight and calisthenics is reps/weight.

Just because it's "mainstream" doesn't mean it has no valuable information. Do some research yourself, you need it.


I'm beginning to wonder if you know what the word "lifting" means. Here is for you: http://www.wordreference.com/definition/lift

I've done extensive research on the matter and I know more than most people who don't have a sports science degree and stuff like that.

Also how do Monday, Wednesday and Friday constitute good days for training? The Moon and Venus have nothing to do with athleticism. Mercury has a part in it only when it comes to speed, coordination, balance and manual dexterity. The best days for training are indeed Sunday and Tuesday. Thursday comes in when it's about sport and the outdoors, Saturday may come in for endurance.

In my opinion training all muscles two or, at most, three times a week is more than enough. It will get you more muscular than training everyday. Training everyday puts unnecessary strain on the muscles. In this case, it seems we advocate for something similar.

@Frinnis, the easiest push-up exercise is vertical push-up where stand next to a wall, put your hands again it and push. Of course if that's too easy, you can vary the inclination getting closer and closer to the ground. The incline push-up that you described.

Diet is what you eat. You can eat a deficit of calories, you can eat your intended calories or you can eat a surplus of calories. It is not inherently related to a deficit. Your diet is simply about your eating habits.

To lose fat, you need to consume more energy than your body produces through eating. You can achieve this by eating less, exercising or a combination of both. However, calories and macronutrients is not all you should be looking at when you eat. You can't just introduce any crap in your body just because you read the tag and those products allow you to reach your target calories. For example, different sources of proteins contain different amino-acids. Your body can only use 20 amino-acids, the so-called essential amino-acids. Not everything you find on the shelf of the supermarket contains the amino-acids you need. In fact, most products either contain very few of these essential or contain none. I'm currently researching what contains what you need.

Tracking calories for a week or more is exactly what you should do before starting eating a deficit or a surplus of calories. Because you can't simply jump from eating a ton (like more than 2000 calories a day) to eating a 1200 kcal. This exactly what puts a strain on the body and the reason why you go up or down by 200 kcal each week, not all at once. That is, if you are on a restrictive regimen. I think that combine both proper dieting and exercise works best, but this is only my opinion.

I used to alternate between eating less and eating more on a cycle of two weeks each, which yield very positive results. I lost no muscle mass and I'm still lean now that I don't need to do that anymore. Over time I learned to listen to my body's needs, but I know there is still much more awareness I need to develop to have the full picture of my needs.

Not all models are on ridiculously restrictive diet.
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HeilOdin666
Posts: 150

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HeilOdin666 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 5:25 pm

So maybe I can share some useful things I've found on my path. I've been lifting since I was in High School. Pretty much I've been active in one way or another my whole life with only a few small periods where I was not.

Forget everything they tell you to buy. Not saying that it's never okay but in looking sexy it's about the fundamentals first before anything.

What happened a lot to me is I wold build up, start getting in good shape. And I was easing into it as well. I wasn't going on some chest puffing competition to lift hard. I was taking it easy compared to many guys I saw in the gym.

Even still I would eventually get burned out. And I would like 6 months later have to go back down in weights. And start over. There was a glass ceiling. And even if I still kept at the weight I was doing I would start to lose muscle mass. Despite lifting the same.

So with bioelectricity and your 3 meals and a couple snacks each day you have enough to look like anything you want. Bioelectricity is key. That's why I kept falling down from the gains I made. The electricity reserves got used up.

And now that mine is higher from yoga and meditation I see quicker gains than ever before from any protein shakes or lifting routines. So build your witch power and then the next important thing is food. The right kind.

Seriously I look way better for way less effort than before thanks to living a spiritual life. And I've even built some muscle just from Hatha yoga and better circulation.

I myself lift and believe there is some merit to using weights. Could be wrong though.

I don't like to use bars. I like to use dumbbells. They aren't stabilized so you have to use all the stabilizing muscles that you don't use on a machine or with a bar. Sometimes I use a bar or a machine for legs.
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AscendingSun
Posts: 95

Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:46 am

Stormblood wrote:
AscendingSun wrote:
Stormblood wrote:AscendingSun, the difference between high-reps and low-reps applies to any weight-lifting, including calisthenics. The thing is that in real life, you don't need just lifting strength. You also need pulling strength, pushing strength and sometimes even striking strength. Lifting only developes, you figured it, lifting strength. What of the other kinds? You need to complement your lifting regime with other things to develop.

That aside, as HP Mageson said, your physical fitness should be adequate to what your personal dharma requires. You know, your career, your lifestyle and stuff. I agree with that and I hope I understood it right.

bodybuilding.com is one of the mainstream channels of bro-science and thus unadvised.


You clearly have no idea what you're talking about. How is pulling, pushing, etc not part of lifting??? What are rows, what is bench press?
The difference between lifting weight and calisthenics is reps/weight.

Just because it's "mainstream" doesn't mean it has no valuable information. Do some research yourself, you need it.


I'm beginning to wonder if you know what the word "lifting" means. Here is for you: http://www.wordreference.com/definition/lift

I've done extensive research on the matter and I know more than most people who don't have a sports science degree and stuff like that.

Also how do Monday, Wednesday and Friday constitute good days for training? The Moon and Venus have nothing to do with athleticism. Mercury has a part in it only when it comes to speed, coordination, balance and manual dexterity. The best days for training are indeed Sunday and Tuesday. Thursday comes in when it's about sport and the outdoors, Saturday may come in for endurance.

In my opinion training all muscles two or, at most, three times a week is more than enough. It will get you more muscular than training everyday. Training everyday puts unnecessary strain on the muscles. In this case, it seems we advocate for something similar.

@Frinnis, the easiest push-up exercise is vertical push-up where stand next to a wall, put your hands again it and push. Of course if that's too easy, you can vary the inclination getting closer and closer to the ground. The incline push-up that you described.

Diet is what you eat. You can eat a deficit of calories, you can eat your intended calories or you can eat a surplus of calories. It is not inherently related to a deficit. Your diet is simply about your eating habits.

To lose fat, you need to consume more energy than your body produces through eating. You can achieve this by eating less, exercising or a combination of both. However, calories and macronutrients is not all you should be looking at when you eat. You can't just introduce any crap in your body just because you read the tag and those products allow you to reach your target calories. For example, different sources of proteins contain different amino-acids. Your body can only use 20 amino-acids, the so-called essential amino-acids. Not everything you find on the shelf of the supermarket contains the amino-acids you need. In fact, most products either contain very few of these essential or contain none. I'm currently researching what contains what you need.

Tracking calories for a week or more is exactly what you should do before starting eating a deficit or a surplus of calories. Because you can't simply jump from eating a ton (like more than 2000 calories a day) to eating a 1200 kcal. This exactly what puts a strain on the body and the reason why you go up or down by 200 kcal each week, not all at once. That is, if you are on a restrictive regimen. I think that combine both proper dieting and exercise works best, but this is only my opinion.

I used to alternate between eating less and eating more on a cycle of two weeks each, which yield very positive results. I lost no muscle mass and I'm still lean now that I don't need to do that anymore. Over time I learned to listen to my body's needs, but I know there is still much more awareness I need to develop to have the full picture of my needs.

Not all models are on ridiculously restrictive diet.


Okay obviously "lifting" refers to weight lifting/training and that definition doesn't counter what I said anyway. MWF is an example it doesn't matter. I'm starting to think you're a sophist. If you have an emotional reason to believe calisthenics are better then make a topic on it, this one is for LIFTING.

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Oct 02, 2017 2:50 am

HeilOdin666 wrote:So maybe I can share some useful things I've found on my path. I've been lifting since I was in High School. Pretty much I've been active in one way or another my whole life with only a few small periods where I was not.

Forget everything they tell you to buy. Not saying that it's never okay but in looking sexy it's about the fundamentals first before anything.

What happened a lot to me is I wold build up, start getting in good shape. And I was easing into it as well. I wasn't going on some chest puffing competition to lift hard. I was taking it easy compared to many guys I saw in the gym.

Even still I would eventually get burned out. And I would like 6 months later have to go back down in weights. And start over. There was a glass ceiling. And even if I still kept at the weight I was doing I would start to lose muscle mass. Despite lifting the same.

So with bioelectricity and your 3 meals and a couple snacks each day you have enough to look like anything you want. Bioelectricity is key. That's why I kept falling down from the gains I made. The electricity reserves got used up.

And now that mine is higher from yoga and meditation I see quicker gains than ever before from any protein shakes or lifting routines. So build your witch power and then the next important thing is food. The right kind.

Seriously I look way better for way less effort than before thanks to living a spiritual life. And I've even built some muscle just from Hatha yoga and better circulation.

I myself lift and believe there is some merit to using weights. Could be wrong though.

I don't like to use bars. I like to use dumbbells. They aren't stabilized so you have to use all the stabilizing muscles that you don't use on a machine or with a bar. Sometimes I use a bar or a machine for legs.


The barbell is a free weight as well, it's the machines that don't engage stabilizers.

Yoga definitely does help with recovery and circulation. I do yoga before and after exercising while my muscles are still warm and get the best buzz from that. I've noticed doing yoga cold is the least beneficial.

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:00 am

Also I do recall HP Maxine and maybe HP Cobra said weight lifting increases bioelectricity over time. It dips after then rises higher when recovered.

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HeilOdin666
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HeilOdin666 » Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:31 pm

What is this resource limit reached?

Anyway I mean certain lifts I don't use barbell. Usually I like to avoid it. Because everyone has a dominant arm for example and with dumbbell you correct it and even the strength of both arms out. Add a rep or two to the left side if you are right handed. And once they are even then maybe use barbell but in your daily life you will favor your right and eventually they get out of sinc again. So I prefer to stick to dumbbell but it's not a hard rule for me. They are lifts it might be good imo.
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:32 pm

AscendingSun wrote:Yoga definitely does help with recovery and circulation. I do yoga before and after exercising while my muscles are still warm and get the best buzz from that. I've noticed doing yoga cold is the least beneficial.


I do it after my muscular routine and after running. It feels great. This is hatha yoga I'm talking about. I'm thinking about trying kundalini yoga before training, just after warming up. Nice to hear you're having good results with that.
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Nick Vabzircnila » Mon Oct 02, 2017 4:38 pm

I think people should examine the reason why it is they want to lift weights. I recently quit. But everytime I was in the gym, I would always see at least one guy of modest stature and build exercising in a way that was completely against his nature. When they finished their sets, they got up and posed in front of the mirror, taking pictures of whatever. It sounds surreal, but this I found is very normal. And I would always laugh on the inside. Not at the person's size or even technique, but at the way their insecurities manifested and caused them to go completely against what was natural for them personally. I could see they were hurting themselves, physically but also mentally as half a year later, they were still the same size. Which reinforced their insecurity. So they wasted countless of hours each week hurting themselves because they were followers of the crowd, which in itself is a mass of individuals with hangups that among other things manifest themselves in the form of derogatory terms like tots, which are just projections. Because they wanted to look like the Hulk. Instead, they could have spend time developing things they have natural aptitude for.

On the other hand, I saw (known) people who were naturally very physically strong. In many of these cases they are obsessive personalities who also end up hurting themselves. This they find later in life. Sure, you may be able to pick someone up by the throat now with one arm, but when you're 60, you're in a wheelchair or something.

For me personally, I am naturally of a stocky build and get very strong and large very fast. This is in my genetics. I also gain weight fast if I just sit on my ass. I quit weight lifting because I found it to be a bit lonely. I spend hours and hours doing solitary work each week, and going to the gym and lifting weights by yourself after such a day gets boring. I never liked going with other people, as weight lifting requires focus, in my opinion. Instead, I'm considering a team sport, martial arts or something of a more social nature where I can still get some exercise.

Just saw this thread and my reaction was whoah. Everyone has so strong opinions on these things. Even though they are individual and never apply universally to everyone. I noticed this in threads on the previous forum as well, even among spiritual people. This is one thing that can really get people going. Where is this intensity coming from?

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Oct 02, 2017 7:56 pm

Nick Vabzircnila wrote:I think people should examine the reason why it is they want to lift weights. I recently quit. But everytime I was in the gym, I would always see at least one guy of modest stature and build exercising in a way that was completely against his nature. When they finished their sets, they got up and posed in front of the mirror, taking pictures of whatever. It sounds surreal, but this I found is very normal. And I would always laugh on the inside. Not at the person's size or even technique, but at the way their insecurities manifested and caused them to go completely against what was natural for them personally. I could see they were hurting themselves, physically but also mentally as half a year later, they were still the same size. Which reinforced their insecurity. So they wasted countless of hours each week hurting themselves because they were followers of the crowd, which in itself is a mass of individuals with hangups that among other things manifest themselves in the form of derogatory terms like tots, which are just projections. Because they wanted to look like the Hulk. Instead, they could have spend time developing things they have natural aptitude for.

On the other hand, I saw (known) people who were naturally very physically strong. In many of these cases they are obsessive personalities who also end up hurting themselves. This they find later in life. Sure, you may be able to pick someone up by the throat now with one arm, but when you're 60, you're in a wheelchair or something.

For me personally, I am naturally of a stocky build and get very strong and large very fast. This is in my genetics. I also gain weight fast if I just sit on my ass. I quit weight lifting because I found it to be a bit lonely. I spend hours and hours doing solitary work each week, and going to the gym and lifting weights by yourself after such a day gets boring. I never liked going with other people, as weight lifting requires focus, in my opinion. Instead, I'm considering a team sport, martial arts or something of a more social nature where I can still get some exercise.

Just saw this thread and my reaction was whoah. Everyone has so strong opinions on these things. Even though they are individual and never apply universally to everyone. I noticed this in threads on the previous forum as well, even among spiritual people. This is one thing that can really get people going. Where is this intensity coming from?


Just some healthy banter brother. But I was getting a little steamed so sorry I was being rude @Stormblood

It's definitely more for athletic type people. I've played sports my whole life and have hard Mars/Sun and Mars/Jupiter aspects in my chart; I was one of those kids diagnosed with ADHD even though my grades were perfect (my mom didn't make me take speed fortunately). But I feel awful if I'm not active and I feel great when I push myself doing weights, running, sprinting, whatever.

I'm also trying to learn martial arts, Judo to start, but no one wants to let me throw them around :-(

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Tue Oct 03, 2017 8:34 am

@Nick May I suggest rugby union? (I'm biased lol)

@AscendingSun It's okay. I didn't actually perceive you as rude or anything. Just opinionated, which is a good thing in my book. Most people I used to talk with were very carefree and I honestly hated that. This is a normal sharing of opinions for me and I apologise if I came off as rude or anything. I have Mars/Sun and Mars/Jupiter aspect as well, in my chart. Mars/chart ruler and Mars/co-ruler... I have done workings to allow Mars traits to be more manifest and more powerful, so... I can relate to feeling awful if I'm not active and feeling great if I concern myself with as much athletic and outdoorsy activity as possible. I have a loathe for laziness.
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Nick Vabzircnila » Tue Oct 03, 2017 3:17 pm

AscendingSun wrote:
Just some healthy banter brother. But I was getting a little steamed so sorry I was being rude @Stormblood

It's definitely more for athletic type people. I've played sports my whole life and have hard Mars/Sun and Mars/Jupiter aspects in my chart; I was one of those kids diagnosed with ADHD even though my grades were perfect (my mom didn't make me take speed fortunately). But I feel awful if I'm not active and I feel great when I push myself doing weights, running, sprinting, whatever.

I'm also trying to learn martial arts, Judo to start, but no one wants to let me throw them around :-(


Those can be really good aspects to have. Good you found an outlet for this energy. This just goes to show how many people are misdiagnosed with things like ADHD when in reality, they just have powerful or combative energies. About throwing people around, remember you have to join a club or something. Random people on the street get scared if you just throw them around, hahaha. ;)

Stormblood wrote:@Nick May I suggest rugby union? (I'm biased lol)


That's actually a really good idea. It's not a widely played sport where I live, but I know there are clubs. It looks like fun. Thanks for the suggestion!

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Tue Oct 03, 2017 6:15 pm

@AscendingSun
I'll let myself be thrown around, if you let me do the same hahaha I don't particularly like judo, though. Tastes. Chinese martial arts like wing chun and bagua zhang, for example, appeal to me the most.

@NickSorryICan'tPronounceYourNameButI'dBeInterestedInLearningDanish
That's my favourite sport for you. I think it's very funny when fair play is involved, which means not wanting to harm someone when the ref isn't looking just cause you want a tactical advantage xD Like all sports, I prefer playing to anything else. I think it's a minor sport in most European countries, if we exclude "Great" Britain and Truly Supreme Ireland, unfortunately. Despite me living in a country that takes part in the Six Nations Tournament, the few club here aren't really high-level. *rugger next door hears about this and comes to punch me* :lol:
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_Viktor_
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby _Viktor_ » Wed Oct 04, 2017 12:21 pm

Great thread.

The program posted by AS seems to be a good one if you're healthy and young.
I personally have trained for somewhat long time and had to stop because of injuries(guitar did its damage too). I also used to train folks on a free base and this is what I have observed...

-lots of expectations with minimal consistency
-no idea what is best for size and strength(although both are loosely connected to each other)
-no feel for the bodytype one was born with
-not much regard for nutrition, lots of shakes, too many calories and hence too much fat
-no "professional attitude" towards performance enhancing drugs
-no regard for the "kinetic chain"
-the magic formula was always around the corner
-improper treatment of injuries
-women were the worse trainees... biggest expectations when they had the hormonal balance of a toddler. Perceived injuries which ended their "career"

Ok, after all these pissy things I may add a few more constructive tidbits....
-safe hypertrophy can be built via a LOT of reps(40 - 100+)
-using bands adds a very nice additonal stressor which can further adaption(size)
-joints, ligaments and tendons also love the high reps and minor aches/pains/injuries can be overcome/healed(tendonitis be gone)
-eat pig gelatine(organic only) to "nurture the joints"
-take a "hyaluronic supplement"(sometimes nagging back-/joint-pains simply vanish)
-find a workload that you can adapt to "continuously" and which is feasible to work nearly every day(this was the system that made people grow the most)
-all above said is for the injured or the ones who do not strive for performance but "bodily shaping" aka less fat and more muscle
-it can also be added as an aid routine for those who have a strength- or skill-related routine that, of course, need specialized knowledge and periodization
-Experiment but do not kill yourself

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ASQV13886662080
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby ASQV13886662080 » Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:32 pm

I really enjoy the points made between Ascending Sun and Storm Blood regarding the comparison and contrast of lifting versus calisthenics.

The CNS can certainly be optimized in calisthenic training and yet external weightlifting retains the necessary "grit" factor when dealing with day to day extremes of labor.

Central Force kept up with his usual great advice as regards repetition causing the Qi to dominate in the areas and eventually stagnate, which is why the 8 Fold Path along with Qi Gong or any dynamic mobility exercises are a daily requirement.

I personally took what HP Mageson said about re-bounders for inclusion to my low joint impact cardio, aside with jumping rope. The bouncing kind of irritated some internal organs though and this was likely a sign of stagnation due to my dietary choices or some weak fascia that needed gradual conditioning.

I actually prefer to combine calisthenics with the essential large motor unit movers for balance like the bench press, standing bar or sitting cable rows (often alternating single grip for isolating better ROM on the back), and dead lift variations.

Im not a big fan of bar squats but try to include it. I feel the dead lift and neutral grip with heavy dumb bells or substitute materials fulfills the functional training for laborious carries.

I try not to do as much heavy lifting like my ego dictated in high school for single limb or awkward lifts like 70 pound bicep curls as I was literally knocking on the boundary door between strength and the emergency room with those stunts.

Im built stocky at 5'6 but have my mothers endurance genetics with my fathers power lifting genetics. This means my prioritized training fluctuates a lot.

I used to do a lot of jogging following my high school lift years and lots a lot of weight but also a lot of neural muscular coordination (Strength at specific movement patterns like the bench press).

I felt fit but lacking somehow building up to those 5-10 mile jogs Id do a few times a week and so I crashed hard.

I tried going back to lifting heavy, this time with emphasis on balancing my lower body with the top, but a Uranus/Mars transit has thrown me off most of the last year until recent months where a Jupiter transit threw that off and I got back on track.

I see now that jogging is the worst of both aspects with combining the impact of running with the cardio of brisk walking. Not very efficient.

Not only this but studies have been done tracking correlations between marathoner types and heart issues exceeding relatively more sedentary types.

Im going to take what I read from Johnson Akemi once and I found on other sources to back it up, along with my natural urges that brisk walking and sprints (fast running not necessarily all out blowing a hamstring running) in intervals are the most beneficial and satisfying to me.

Ideally gravel roads are solid enough to balance joint impact with gripping the ground but soil, sand, or grass at steady planes or inclines give you the best ankle stabilizing without the joint impact a hard top or road will.

I should include I have a prominent housed Mars that is trine with Mercury but the sign Mars is in is counteractive to aggression and Mercury, though home, is in a house that might hide its potential.
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:09 am

Stormblood wrote:@AscendingSun
I'll let myself be thrown around, if you let me do the same hahaha I don't particularly like judo, though. Tastes. Chinese martial arts like wing chun and bagua zhang, for example, appeal to me the most.

@NickSorryICan'tPronounceYourNameButI'dBeInterestedInLearningDanish
That's my favourite sport for you. I think it's very funny when fair play is involved, which means not wanting to harm someone when the ref isn't looking just cause you want a tactical advantage xD Like all sports, I prefer playing to anything else. I think it's a minor sport in most European countries, if we exclude "Great" Britain and Truly Supreme Ireland, unfortunately. Despite me living in a country that takes part in the Six Nations Tournament, the few club here aren't really high-level. *rugger next door hears about this and comes to punch me* :lol:


Hell yeah

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EnkiUK
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby EnkiUK » Sat Oct 07, 2017 8:07 pm

Alot of good opinions guys Stormblood esp.
I started Weightlifting whilst in jail got very strong went from 9st to 13.5 although now i am trying to do bodybuilding (i never knew the difference lol)

Started last week will let you know if it works less fat more muscle more reps less weight
HP mage is clued up on this as well guys

best of luck
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Aquarius
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Aquarius » Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:21 am

EnkiUK wrote:Alot of good opinions guys Stormblood esp.
I started Weightlifting whilst in jail got very strong went from 9st to 13.5 although now i am trying to do bodybuilding (i never knew the difference lol)

Started last week will let you know if it works less fat more muscle more reps less weight
HP mage is clued up on this as well guys

best of luck
bodybuilding, in my opinion, is the most retarded thing ever, machines are shit, you are not even building real strenght, just the one to use those retarded machines.
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby EnkiUK » Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:28 pm

Not really sure what you are talking about above poster?

Bodybuilding pointless and retarded? Can think of many things that are more retarded than that fs
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AscendingSun
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:19 pm

EnkiUK wrote:Not really sure what you are talking about above poster?

Bodybuilding pointless and retarded? Can think of many things that are more retarded than that fs


I think he just means bodybuilding is more aesthetic and powerlifting or lifting for strength is more functional, like if you want to be able to overpower someone. I have no problem with natural bodybuilding, working to look like a Greek statue is a noble goal imo and you still get stronger

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HP Mageson666 » Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:35 pm

There needs to be a completive Palumboism wing of body building.....

Image

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby HP Mageson666 » Sun Oct 08, 2017 11:39 pm

Powerlifting for sport is bad for your spine. There was a link to a sports doctor stated that if you do yoga and powerlift your going to have problems. You have to turn your spine into concrete and be inflexible.

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AscendingSun
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby AscendingSun » Mon Oct 09, 2017 12:47 am

HP Mageson666 wrote:Powerlifting for sport is bad for your spine. There was a link to a sports doctor stated that if you do yoga and powerlift your going to have problems. You have to turn your spine into concrete and be inflexible.


Interesting. I've seen plenty of videos of crossfitters doing deadlifts with horrible technique, rounded spine, just asking for injury. All the top athletes are extremely flexible though. I think it's more a question of technique and knowledge. In my former job I had to routinely lift 50-100lbs and they made us stretch for 15 mins at the beginning of our shift everyday as a safety requirement.

ex. https://youtu.be/x522dB-4y2w?t=2m41s

belthazorthemighty
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby belthazorthemighty » Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:30 am

HP Mageson666 wrote:Powerlifting for sport is bad for your spine. There was a link to a sports doctor stated that if you do yoga and powerlift your going to have problems. You have to turn your spine into concrete and be inflexible.


do you remember which sports doctor it was?

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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Stormblood » Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:44 pm

Bodybuilding is retarded. Bodybuilders build bodies that are excessively muscular and extremely inflexible. Before contest, they almost completely dehydrate themselves (the Red Cross told me) which is extremely unhealthy and can lead to a wide range of health issues. They also take illegal drugs to achieve those bodies, as it's not possible in nature without those drugs.
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EnkiUK
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby EnkiUK » Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:00 pm

Yeah AscendingSun like a sculpted greek god im looking for that look :D

HP mage ur right all they BBers are all distented bellies looking like that i just want to keep a good level of strength but try the bodybuilding training instead of weightlifting/powerlifting.

As HP said powerlifting is dangerous especially if performed with improper technique i injured my back doing deadlift :o :o Bad manual handling :lol: :lol:

Good luck
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Hail Satan to Victory

Malpirgi Zodinu
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Malpirgi Zodinu » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:09 pm

Yoga, push ups, pull ups, sit ups, that's all I need to stay in shape. I also make a point to take a walk almost everyday.
If your job requires you to be strong ( i.e. construction, landscaping, farm work, etc.), just working that job will get you in the shape you need to be.

There's a difference between looking like a Greek God statue, and being strong. Take the example of the barrel-chested farmer, with no muscle definition, who can throw around any gym buff. The opposite can also be true. I know a guy who is average height, thin, but is basically muscle and bones. He doesn't lift weights, just uses his body weight for exercise. Well, he's one of the strongest people I know, pound for pound.

The key is understanding your body type, and exercising accordingly. That, and staying active ( this includes Yoga, as it has been called "exercising while being still").

@Stormblood - Here's our long-awaited thread on working out, I guess ;) BTW, I like your new avatar pic. I've always been a fan of all cats, big or small...lions especially.
"DU BIST NICHTS OHNE DEIN VOLK UND DEINE SIPPE"
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Nick Vabzircnila
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Re: Beginner Lifting Guide

Postby Nick Vabzircnila » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:51 pm

Stormblood wrote:Bodybuilding is retarded. Bodybuilders build bodies that are excessively muscular and extremely inflexible. Before contest, they almost completely dehydrate themselves (the Red Cross told me) which is extremely unhealthy and can lead to a wide range of health issues. They also take illegal drugs to achieve those bodies, as it's not possible in nature without those drugs.


I know some martial artists do this as well, in order to stay in their weight class. I saw a documentary with a woman who starved herself and lived in a sweat suit for several days before her fight. Guess what, she lost. She was obviously feeling miserable.That's just insane. Martial arts, bodybuilding or whatever - it should be done for the sake of physical and spiritual health, nothing else. Name is Enochian BTW!


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